Workaround steps for end-users to enable Legacy Game Compatibility Mode with affected games that have not received a software fix:

1. Power-up system and enter system BIOS setup.
2. Enable switch Legacy Game Compatibility Mode to ON (one-time only) in BIOS.
3. Save BIOS setup changes and exit.
4. Boot to OS.
4. Toggle Keyboard Scroll Lock key ON.
5. Launch affected game title.
6. Toggle Keyboard Scroll Lock key OFF after ending game title.

Source: Intel

What the fuck, Intel!? Seriously? Scroll Lock?? ROFLMAO!!!

GTA Online. Infamous for its slow loading times. Having picked up the game again to finish some of the newer heists I was shocked (/s) to discover that it still loads just as slow as the day it was released 7 years ago.

It was time. Time to get to the bottom of this.

First I wanted to check if someone had already solved this problem. Most of the results I found pointed towards anecdata about how the game is so sophisticated that it needs to load so long, stories on how the p2p network architecture is rubbish (not saying that it isn’t), some elaborate ways of loading into story mode and a solo session after that and a couple of mods that allowed skipping the startup R* logo video. Some more reading told me we could save a whopping 10-30 seconds with these combined!

Source: t0st

Rockstar, you had one simple job and you fucked up! This fix had cost about one hour of work, but you decided to release an unfinished game when the hardware available at that time wasn’t even capable of playing the game with maximum details. And now you wonder why people are mad at you. *facepalm*

OpenSSH is great. I like it. But the version that comes bundled with Windows 10 sucks. Setup is pretty easy and straight forward. But due to the way access is handled in Windows (e.g., by ACLs) and the fact that it (the Linux/Unix version as well for obvious reasons) does not support links which point to resources outside of the chrooted environment, it’s rather useless for my purposes.

I’d like to have an OpenSSH based solution where I’m able to work with virtual file-systems for chrooted environments just like FTP, and without the need to create a bunch of otherwise useless users in the operating system. Oh, I have such wonderful memories of the Gene6 FTP server. That was a truly great product. Unfortunately, it’s development ceased in 2019 and their website is broken.

Well, yes, I know that it’s not the way how SSH works. But for chrooted environments which are mainly used as SFTP it would actually make sense. Like, somehow a portable installation of OpenSSH. That would be pretty nice.

Microsoft has blocked a Trend Micro driver from running on Windows 10 – and Trend has withdrawn downloads of its rootkit detector that uses the driver – after the code appeared to game Redmond’s QA tests.

Late last week, Trend removed downloads of its Rootkit Buster from its website. And last night it emerged the kernel-level driver at the heart of the software, tmcomm.sys, was added to Windows 10 20H1’s list of blocked drivers – preventing it from loading and Rootkit Buster from running.

Windows internals guru and CrowdStrike veep Alex Ionescu discovered the blockade, and highlighted it on Twitter, while investigating research by computer security undergrad Bill Demirkapi that revealed not only shortcomings in the driver’s code but also an effort to detect Microsoft’s QA test suite.

Demirkapi, as we reported last week, discovered tmcomm.sys altered the way it allocated memory to pass Microsoft’s Windows Hardware Quality Labs (WHQL) certification tests.

Passing these tests is highly desirable: if a driver meets the grade, it can be digitally signed by Microsoft, is trusted by Windows, and potentially can be distributed via Windows Update and similar mechanisms.

Source: The Register

For a recent project, I had to do research into methods rootkits are detected and the most effective measures to catch them when I asked the question, what are some existing solutions to rootkits and how do they function? My search eventually landed me on the TrendMicro RootkitBuster which describes itself as “A free tool that scans hidden files, registry entries, processes, drivers, and the master boot record (MBR) to identify and remove rootkits”.

The features it boasted certainly caught my attention. They were claiming to detect several techniques rootkits use to burrow themselves into a machine, but how does it work under the hood and can we abuse it? I decided to find out by reverse engineering core components of the application itself, leading me down a rabbit hole of code that scarred me permanently, to say the least.

Source: Bill Demirkapi

On Sunday, Eindhoven University of Technology researcher Björn Ruytenberg revealed the details of a new attack method he’s calling Thunderspy. On Thunderbolt-enabled Windows or Linux PCs manufactured before 2019, his technique can bypass the login screen of a sleeping or locked computer—and even its hard disk encryption—to gain full access to the computer’s data. And while his attack in many cases requires opening a target laptop’s case with a screwdriver, it leaves no trace of intrusion and can be pulled off in just a few minutes. That opens a new avenue to what the security industry calls an “evil maid attack,” the threat of any hacker who can get alone time with a computer in, say, a hotel room. Ruytenberg says there’s no easy software fix, only disabling the Thunderbolt port altogether.

Source: Wired

See Björn Ruytenberg’s “Breaking Thunderbolt Protocol Security: Vulnerability Report 2020” for any details. Here’s a local copy in case it gets depublished for any reason.

Recently, I experienced I/O issues while trying to scan documents on my Samsung SL-C460W. It has worked flawlessly with Windows 10 before, so seems like something changed in the latest Windows 10 build.

Reinstalling the Samsung scanner driver didn’t help, also scanning by WIA did not work. Communicating with the scanner was no longer possible, while printing works without any issues.

Seems like due to changes in recent Windows 10 builds two file have been removed which are required by the scanner driver to be able to communicate with the device.

Luckily Samsung has provied a fix for that. Officially it’s meant for some other multi-functional device, but it works fine with the C460 series, too.

Find it on the Samsung webpage.

2019-05-07 @ 08:01: Linux kernel for Windows Linux | Windows

From June 2019 the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) will feature a real Linux kernel. While the current WSL1 is just some kind of wrapper, an incomplete Linux distribution with lots of limitations, the new WSL2 will feature full system call compatibility.

To my mind this will make use of Hyper-V, which in turn will likely block access to VT-x for other virtual environments such as VirtualBox and VMware. So, quite a clever move by Microsoft.

Luckily they’ll support further development of WSL1, too.

Read more at Microsoft.


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    Destabilizing cishetero amatonormativity. Providing disruption as a service. Once you know the way, you see it in all things. Unless you puke, faint or die, keep going. Also I never asked for this. I̸͝t̸̑ ̵̽i̷͗s̶͐ ̵͝a̶͒l̷ ͍r̷ ̗͕e̵͑a̶͌d̸̄y̷̚ ̶̀ ͓͑t̷̚ô̶o̸ ̥ ̶́ ̡l̷͝a̶̽t̵͒ė̶.̸ ̋͑

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